POST TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER


 

PTSD, or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder, is a psychiatric disorder that can occur following the experience of a life-threatening event such as military combat, natural disasters, terrorist incidents, serious accidents, or physical or sexual assault as an adult or in childhood. Most survivors of trauma return to normal, given a little time. However, some people will have stress reactions that do not go away on their own or may even get worse over time. These individuals may develop PTSD. People who suffer from PTSD often relive the experience through nightmares and flashbacks, have difficulty sleeping, and feel detached or estranged, and these symptoms can be severe enough and last long enough to significantly impair the person’s daily life.

People with PTSD experience three different kinds of symptoms. The first set of symptoms involves reliving the trauma in some way, such as becoming upset when confronted with a traumatic reminder or thinking about the trauma when they are trying to do something else. The second set of symptoms involves either staying away from places or people that remind them of the trauma, isolating themselves from other people, or feeling numb. The third set of symptoms includes things such as feeling on guard, irritable, or startling easily.

PTSD is marked by clear biological changes as well as psychological symptoms. PTSD is complicated by the fact that people with PTSD often may develop additional disorders such as depression, substance abuse, problems with memory and cognition, and other physical and mental health problems. The disorder is also associated with impairment of the person’s ability to function in social or family life, including occupational instability, marital problems and divorces, family discord, and difficulties in parenting.

PTSD can be treated with psychotherapy (talk therapy) and medicines such as antidepressants. Early treatment is important and may help reduce long-term symptoms. Unfortunately, many people do not know that they have PTSD or do not seek treatment.

 

What are signs of PTSD in Police?

COMMON SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF PTSD


Physical

Fatigue
Vomiting or Nausea
Chest Pain
Twitches
Thirst
Weakness
Insomnia or Nightmares
Breathing Difficulty
Muscle Tremors
Grinding of Teeth
Profuse Sweating
Pounding Heart
Diarrhea or Intestinal Upsets
Headaches

Behavioral

Withdrawal
Pacing & Restlessness
Emotional Outbursts
Anti-Social Acts
Suspicion and Paranoia
Inability to Rest
Loss of Interest in Hobbies
Increased Alcohol Consumption
Other Substance Abuse

Emotional

Anxiety or Panic
Guilt
Fear
Denial
Irritability
Depression
Intense Anger
Agitation
Apprehension

“Out of suffering have emerged the strongest souls; the most massive characters are seared with scars.”
Khalil Gibran 

Am I stressed?

Identify Stress in yourself


 

If you experience the symptoms below, Post Traumatic Stress Disorder may be starting to show its early signs. Please see a doctor, as well as a qualified Police Stress Therapist, to discourage the disorder from getting worse.

Headaches
Fatigue
Pounding Heart
Digestive Upsets
Teeth Grinding
Light Headedness
Lowered Sex Drive
Irritably
Short-temper
Backaches
Muscle Aches
Loss or Gain in Weight
Insomnia
Restlessness
Muscle Tics
Drinking too Much